FAQs

1. What do I wear?
Meditation can be done wearing anything. It is best to be comfortable. We have three different seating options to accommodate any attire you arrive in.

2. Is this religious?
Mindfulness meditation is not religious. However, one can bring their personal beliefs into their practice.

3. What is the best time of day to meditate?
Consistency is most important. The same therapeutic benefits exist regardless of time of day it is practiced.

4. How long should I meditate for?
Most research has looked at 30 minute meditations. This is a good time to strive for but results have been shown in as little as 5 minutes of practice.

5. Is it better to do one long meditation or break it into 2 shorter meditations?
Both are great options.

6. Can I meditate laying down?
Sitting is the optimal position because it provides the perfect balance of focus and relaxation. When the body is in an upright position the mind and body are more attentive. When the body is lying down it naturally wants to fall asleep. There are meditations where lying down is suggested such as in sound meditation.

7. Can I meditate by myself?
Absolutely. This is a self-practice to know the self.

8. How do I know if I am doing it right?
There is no wrong way to meditate as long as you are learning how to meditate. There are key points to look for: stillness, ease of being, the present moment, freedom from time and heightened awareness.

9. What will happen when I meditate?
In mindfulness meditation we become more aware of the present moment. You may notice subtleties such as the temperature, smells, sounds, or your physical body.

10. What if I cannot stop my thoughts/mind?
It is okay. It is a big misconception that we have to stop our “monkey mind.” Our brain is continually thinking and processing. Even in our sleep our minds are at work. As thoughts arrive, recognize them and allow them to pass without judgement or attachment.

11. What is the best way to learn meditation?
The best way to learn is by doing it. Meditation is something that we naturally know how to do. Each experience is very different and the more you do it, the more you will learn. Forming the discipline to sit down and actually meditate is the challenge. If you are interested and have a desire to learn, you will learn.